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20130112
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would like to present two certificates to you. on behalf of the board of education and the san francisco unified school district. [applause] >> i talked to ester this morning, and i promise i will not take too long. but i will first share my time with two of my outstanding staff members. mrs. jeanna chow and mr. taylor. >> hi, i am jena chou, and i am a kindergarten teacher. i would like to share a few quick reflections. i remember when alice fong yu didn't have enough student and we had to sell the program. and now we don't have to sell the program, in fact we are all sold out. i remember when students went to chinatown to practice the skills and the culture. and now students travel to china to speak the language and live the culture. and none of this it would be without liana szeto. i remember her tireless way to be sure of this success. and determined and still has tireless energy and still have the vision. only now she needs to see it in a slightly larger font. i am -- [laughter] i was going to take that out, but my staff said to keep it in. i am so honored to be a part of alice fong
thrive. and our educators can teach. we are fortunate to have trained professionals on our campuses. including social workers and nurses and wellness services. and ladies and gentlemen, if not for the largess of the san francisco voting community, we would not be able to do this. we want to thank you for the voting of our schools. when you go to the ballot box and vote for the parcel tax and bonds, this is what you vote for. the systems that keep people safe. and we want to thank you. and we have wellness centers and as you know it takes a village. we will stand with those in our community and across the great state of california. to ensure that students have safe places to learn and thrive and adults have great place to work. as you know i had the honor last friday to serve as the master of ceremonies of our board commissioners, and it was great to see family and friends and supporters to come out to support our board of seeducatio. we look forward to have a productive year for with all of you. and i want to thank ester costo with the work she did organizing. and the principal, jul
for start-ups. staffing, exactly. so we have that as part of this innovation center. >> access to education and access to the right environment. >> yes, i would say so. >> ibm is a big company. i am sure there are a lot of people in the valley that still see it as an east coast-based company. the reality is you have been here for a long time. can you talk about the ontario culture here and what is being done that with the great ideas -- a entrepreneurial culture here and what is being done with the great ideas? >> we started here in 1962. this building is about 25 years old. we were down the hill at the san jose raiders center. -- research center. one of the things that ibm does -- a couple of things. one is having an eye on where things are going. one of the reasons that we focused here on data, relational database disk drive, was, looking at the time, the inability to access data quickly on a computer was actually an inhibitor to getting business done. one of the ways that you get innovation out there is you understand how it is going to be used, really, before you start. the major reason
the world. we have to make sure our education system lifts them to their highest aspirations. when the society ages, it tends to -- it declines. that is the big demographic imperative. i was reviewing one of my favorite books on the roman republic. how did this village on the tiber grow to be the absolute leader of the known world in a few hundred years? it expanded its territory by plunder, by what ever. details. it was not pretty. [laughter] it added people, it kept getting bigger and incorporated the people and to roman citizenship. it became very consolidated, expanding group of energetic people. and they'll work. they were not just a bunch of talkers, they were doing. -- there were doers. -- they were doers. we have to consolidate on this. we have to find the common path that will enable us to make the investments and undergo the sacrifice that is required because it is not all ice cream and cake here. you have to curtail consumption. whether it is a business or household. in terms of -- the free sector. it is still the same game. looking out for the future, saving for tomorr
, and higher education. is this a good thing or bad thing? >> i don't think it's something we need to get too alarmed about right now. there are many factors that contribute it to. one hispanics have highest unemployment rate between 110-13 rate where you have seen the decline. but also cultural thing. as more women get educated and more are in the workforce they are not having the eight kids that my grandmother had now women limit to two or three. a combination of the economy, plus the fact that they're getting a higher education has led to this. i wouldn't get alarmed we're growing at very fast rate. just last ten years we've doubled hispanic population by 2050 we're estimated to be at 12 million. i would say we're watching the situation but it's not an alarming rate yet. >> this is really very -- a very american thing if you think about it. >> notice when this decline stronger than we expected earlier than we expected, when it began, coincides almost exactly with the coming of the recession. and emigrants when they first come to this country repeat the pattern of their home countries they
of a strong-handed role in sort of picking winners and losers in determining who gets educated and how they get educated -- those forms of capitalism seem to be gaining the upper hand in the global debate. and i think we have to recognize that if we don't address the flaws in our own system like the flaws associated with inequality or the inability to create jobs or the free rein given to big investors at the expense of everybody else, we're going to lose our influence, the model's going to change, and we're going to be at a disadvantage. >> host: what's china doing right? >> guest: well, they're growing fast. that helps. by 2030, you know, china's second biggest economy in the world right now. we think of it as an exporting economy, but really their growth has been internal. by 2030, which is not that long away although it sounds far away, they'll be the world's largest consumer economy. they'll be the ones setting the trend in terms of what a car is like and what a washing machine is like can and what an ipad is like. but they're also building more cities than anybody else. they're g
on traditional liberal arts education. . >> woodruff: ray suarez looks into china's current crackdown on the internet and on its own news media, which is drawing protests. >> ifill: and we remember pulitzer prize-winning journalist richard ben cramer, whose work spanned presidential politics and the lives of superstar athletes. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: saving for the heart. you'll be able to get close to iconic landmarks. to cultural places. it's a feeling that you can only get. these are journeys that change your perspective on the world viking river cruises, explore the world >> bnsf railway. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank y. >> woodruff: the renewed concern over mass shootings
education these days is the recent explosion of free online courses. universities are grappling with their impact on teaching and liberal arts education. newshour corresondent spencer michels has our story. >> mark this with d and in a valueive the term you mark with e. >> reporter: tracy lippincott, who works in a san francisco bar, is taking a college course in her apartment, online, on how to reason and argue. the teacher is walter sinnott- armstrong, professor of ethics at duke university in north carolina, and the class is free. >> so how do you learn the technique? the answer is very simple. you practice, and then you practice again, and then you practice and practice and practice and practice. this class has these really short little lectures, which is great because you can kind of watch one, and then think about it and react, and then you don't have to watch another whole hour like you would in class. >> reporter: "think again" is a class presented by a one-year- old for-profit startup called coursera, currently the nation's largest provider of free online courses. 170,0
children are taking to them naturally. they are using smart phones and the educational apps designed for them to get smarter. >> reporter: the 31-year-old and her daughter live in tokyo. she's just a year and ten months old but already he's preoccupied with mom's smartphone. this app is favorite. she touches a drawing of an animal. a photo pops up on screen and then it makes a sound. the apps maker made it to advance the intellect of young children. she started playing with the phone two or three months after she was born. now she uses six different educational apps. >> translator: it's really helpful for times when i can't give her my complete attention or when she starts throwing a tantrum in public. i hand this to her and she gives it all her attention. >> reporter: the youngsters at this nursery school are also going digital. turn the power on please. they use tablets for learning. the apps teach the children to write the japanese alphabet by tracing their fingers along the characters. more than ever teachers and parents are turning to these devices to help them raise children. a
-ups, we are taking steps to make sure conn leads again. when it came to education, the stakes were clear. take action together or risk losing an entire generation of young people to failing schools and a widening achievement gap. i am proud that after a long and hard debate, we were able to say with one voice, that the status quo was no locker acceptable. that when it comes to public education, we cannot keep doing what we have always done and simply hope for better results. that our kids cannot afford it and our state cannot afford it as well. we work with an eye towards a future and have made an historic investment of nearly $100 million from three k to high- school, focusing on those districts that are most in need. reaching kids early is critical to the success and early childhood education had to be a central portion of our education reform. so we created 1000 new school readiness opens statewide for youngsters at a time when no one thought that it was possible. that is 1000 more children that will show up to kindergarten this fall ready to learn. we did that together, and we will d
student who's determined to help young people around the world get a higher education. >>> for decades ethnic minorities from myanmar fled conflict with the former military government to seek refuge in thailand. for many refugee camps are the only home they've ever known. they grew up and went to school in the camps, learning their own ethnic language. but with reconciliation under way in myanmar, educators face a new challenge. how to prepare for the day when the refugees can go home. nhk world's toshiyuki terazawa has the story. >> reporter: children attend an elementary school at the refugee camp in thailand, near the border with myanmar. the camp houses ethnic -- who have left myanmar. refugees have lived in this camp for decades. over the time children have grown up being educated in their native language. refugee leaders created their own education program with the support of organizations including the united nations. this is one of the people responsible. her group set up some 150 schools from nurseries to colleges at seven refugee camps in thailand. >> nearly over 60 years we
of education have spoken again and again about the loss of one of their students. the high school basketball player committed suicide last month. in a note, he said his coach had physically punished him repeatedly. the student said the violence escalated last september after he became team captain. he told his mother in december about a prolonged beating he said he suffered following a practice match. the next day, he killed himself. the mayor of osaka, who's also a lawyer, has condemned the board of education and the school. he is promising a thorough investigation. >> translator: beating someone 30 or 40 times is unpardonable. this is not short of a crime. if it really happened, this can be considered an assault case. >> reporter: japanese law bans physical punishment at schools but ministry of education statistics show it happens just the same. hundreds of teachers across the country have been reprimanded in the past decade for using corporal punishment. in the 2011-2012 school year, 108 of 404 cases happened at sports clubs. the basketball team at the high school in question has made a n
for those of innovation that can help shift the task to work being done by educated eco-and the interface between service provider and community and increase the demand. but if we don't ship to innovation, way. >> i should clarify for audience that the human immune system i very specifically targeted by the hiv virus. so as your cd-4 count goes down, you're headed for his part said the case of the disease. we have time for one more question. i think i sought and stars of family care international but air. >> thanks, laurie. i wanted to ask if you could, specifically in what you see as priorities and transcendent possibilities in sub-saharan africa, the region where the problem of hiv/aids is most severe in terms of population and in particular from the perspective of the long-term potential and the question of the most strategic approach in terms of dealing with hava is more or less of it or to publish your integrate cnet with the provision of basic health services, reproductive, newborn and maternal services, what you see is the most appropriate strategy for dealing with this in africa.
organizational effectiveness and improved doctrine, education, training and exercises. the directive comes with an already increased attention on dsca which we have seen the development of courses and training now delivered at multiple professional military education programs and other venues and the maturing of thinking and policies since 9/11 and katrina. there is a recognition within this analysis that there are gaps in awareness of the capabilities dod can provide in complex catastrophes, as well as the inherent complexities and lack of understanding in our various chains of command and our authorities. the report recognizes what we have used to drive the dsca portion of fleet week, that local authorities are likely to be overwhelmed in a complex catastrophe and that the president will direct support to civil authorities. that san francisco fleet week assumption is now stated as a guiding principle inside the dod for planning and activities. the objective of the dod effort is to enable the effective access to and use of defense capabilities in the event of a disaster. critical to thi
at the deficit problem. it gives $2.7 billion from education through kindergarten through community college. the systems will get an additional $250 million each. it expands healthcare under the healthcare reform and leaves a billion dollars in reserve. the governor's plan to increase public education funding also includes social engineering, poorer districts will get more than other ones. david louie has more. >> west contra costa knows hardship. they got a $46 million bailout and laid off teachers long before the budget crisis. now it has paid off the loan it is getting a shot in the arm. in announcing $2.7 billion in increased funding for public education. >> in richmond, it's not like growing up in los gatos or beverly hills. >> they want to give those hire amounts. julie says it's critical because 70% of the 30,000 students are minority, some of them are still learning english. >> you have to understand that education is the foundation for everything. without that money, without that foundation, we're going to see problems in the future. so fixing it now helps. >> reporter: school dist
of the time. we need to do everything we've been doing with the economy, education, etc. we also need to address the plague and scourge of gun violence. we need to address hurricane sandy. so, yes, it is an aggressive agenda. it is a lot of work. but they elect us to lead, my friends. we will. they elect us to perform and we will. we have proven that we can lead. we have proven that we can perform. we know that with these challenges at hand that is exactly what we must now do. we have daunting challenges. no doubt. but these challenges also pose exciting opportunities. yes, it is hard to reform education. i know the politics of it. i know the problems, i know the issues. but, can you imagine how smart this state would be when we actually educate all our children to the best of the god given potential. when every black child and every white child and every urban child is educated to their full potential. i know helping the economy is hard. i know it has been decades of decline. can you imagine how successful our economy is going to be when that upstate economic engine is running at ful
's behalf. >> california schools are digging deeper to soldther cost of special education -- shoulder the cosof special education -- cost of special education. the report shows the cost to educate a student with disabilities has gone up but state and federal funding remained flat. >>> coming up, we told you about a woman's concern about burglaries in her neighborhood, what happened today. >> and a milestone, why analysts are calling it the biggest change for healthcare in decades.
. >> was different? do you think that educators should allow more choice among the young [inaudible question] >> this is a fascinating question we could spend an hour on. must public-school education, that's what you are suggesting. i know that's what you're suggesting. [laughter] >> okay. one of the things that i have found, and i only took over this in recent years. i have gone over certain things. in high school i was exposed to stuff the bored me to death at the time. thirty or for 40 years later, i remember it with vividness. and then we have an appreciation i can still remember the night watch. canterbury tales by chaucer. all of these things that our children need to be exposed to and not just how i pass this math and science tests. how i get through the next day. it would be a shame we don't expose our children to the right things and give them greater choice with what they want to do with their life. most of them at that age are not sure. sooner or later, something will touch them. i know where i'd be if my life and have been a pattern of 17. keep looking for the thing that you'd do
is how does it treats its women. does it educate that half of the population? does it give an opportunity? when it does, you will police the power of everyone, -- you unleash the power of everyone, not just some, and there was great wisdom in afghanistan ratifying a constitution that recognizes that appeared that should be part of the legacy of these last 10 years. thank you very much, everybody. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> also this afternoon, vice president biden continuing his meetings today comeuppance together a response to last month's shootings at the connecticut elementary school. he is meeting this afternoon with representatives of the video game industry. he said yesterday he will have recommendations to the president next week. we want to hear again from hamas karzai this afternoon. he will be at georgetown university talking about the future of u.s.-afghan relations. that is live at 5:30 eastern on cnn. u.s. army colonel michael meese spoke earlier this week about kevin terrorism. he is a f
. he challenged u.s. power and made friends with enemies. among the educated middle class, he is profoundly unpopular, hated by many and even feared. that oncologist in the country's leading cancer clinic says that violent crime has swept of venezuela. >> a number of my colleagues go around in vehicles, very scared for their lives. every week, one of my friends' families is hit by a kidnapper. that is the terror that we live in. >> in the face of his loyalty, the opposition seems weekend. they dropped their demand for fresh elections and called off a rival demonstration of their own. for now, there is no power vacuum. despite his absence. >> for more on his health, i am joined by the one who formerly served as the director of the central bank. he is so reviled here in washington and you see those people turning out for an inauguration where he is not present and this is not in north korea situation where there are forced in, they really love him. >> his talent is the ability to connect with the people and that he is taking care of their interests. and without him, they would b
for denying girls an education. in october members of the taliban shot her in the head. malala's father accepted the simone de beauvoir's prize for women's freedom on her behalf at an awards ceremony in paris. he directed some of his comments to the taliban. >> they should come to the talks. they should lay down their guns, and they should come to peace and come to humanity. >> organizers projected a photograph of malala and a quote from her onto a screen. she said all she wants is education and she's afraid of no one. doctors sent malala to britain for treatment. a hospital in birmingham released her last week. she's expected to return in the next several weeks for another operation. >>> politics in pakistan is heading for a game changing moment. former sporting hero is winning fans with his fierce stance against u.s. military policy. >> reporter: the 60-year-old is in pakistan. across the country, tens and thousands wait to hear him speak. he once became famous on the field of pakistan's most popular sport, cricket. as captain of the national team in 1992, he thrilled the nation when
her approach to education. >> i've been in charge of communication for three years before the march 11th. and i was pretty sure that i'm doing better communication than ever to explain what the mechanics of the earthquake is. but i haven't said, your life is precious and our information, like tsunami warning, can be very uncertain. >> reporter: oki's interest of bringing seismology to the public began long before the 2011 disaster. the devastating images of the 1995 great earthquake changed the high schoolers life. >> when i saw the tv, like, you know, a girl same age as me, she kept on screaming. she's calling, mom, mom, in front of all the debris. that thing happens at the same time in the same country. that hit me and i decided to be a seismologist on that night. >> reporter: fast forward 16 years. the 2011 great east japan earthquake served as a turning point in oki's career. the magnitude 9 quake and tsunami were far beyond the imagination of many seismologists. they would duck and cover, evacuate and move to higher ground. but that wasn't enough. as an outreach communicator, oki
advocating education for pakistani girls. the 15-year-old now an international symbol of courage. an amazing story of recovery there. >>> his term in the house is over but barney frank could be back on capitol hill. the lawmaker told msnbc he asked to be appointed as a temporary senator if john kerry becomes secretary of state. frank says he wants to be a part of the looming battle over the debt ceiling but says he has no interest in running for the position permanently. >>> let's see if you can spot the difference between the two photos. one of the photos released by nancy pelosi's office and the other shows who is standing on the capitol hill. it is obvious that four congress women have been photo shopped into the picture. pelosi asked if she considered it an accurate historical record today. >> it is active of who the democratic women of congress are and it was freezing cold and our members had been waiting a long time for everyone to arrive and had to get back into the building to greet constituents and family members. it wasn't like we had the rest of the day to stand there. >> it defin
of equality in a just society and a rational choice. she also works on ethics and at the -- in education. she is co-editor of the forthcoming collection, occupy the future. he is a graduate of mit and an early participant in occupy washington -- occupy boston. he specializes in web applications and design. a co-founder in danger of some in cambridge. -- actually, just in central square. if he continues to be engaged in outspoken protests, malfeasance, and a finance industry mismanagement. and next is phil thompson. actually, he is on the end. an associate professor. i'm giving their introductions in the order there will speak. he is a professor at the mit department of urban studies. he is an urban planner and political scientist. -- the deputy manager of the new york housing authority. he is a frequent adviser to trade unions and their efforts to work with immigrants and community groups across the united states. he is the author of a double trouble, black mayors, black communities, and the struggle for democracy. if he is writing a book on community building and development since the 1960's
need to see come back. we continue to see, though, some losses in educational employment at the state and local level and retirees in the postal sector. we have yet to see cutbacks in postal -- the budget for the post office so, that will be a bigger head wind down the road. but we are seeing retirees come out there. the public sector still a drag on the overall numbers. i also think it's important on the health care industry where the surprise on the upside was in nursing and in nursing homes, basically, people -- the 80 and over demographic are the fastest growing demographic today. so you're starting to see that filter through and the contour of the jobs. the flip side of this report, where was the fiscal cliff fears, it was in retail. we saw the retail fires in december. remember, retail was very weak. people started to realize the fiscal cliff was out there. a lot of stores said they never recouped after sandy what they thought they would. and the whole retail season they came in for the discounts but they didn't come in in force. we tau sau the retailers that had hired up early
our beaches. the department of education has worked night and day to give schools -- to get schools reopened as quickly as possible, and where not possible, to get them restored by the next school year, while maintaining our commitment to full 180-day school year of education for all of new jersey's children. executive order one of the seven says when interest payments, they are not compromised by excessive deductibles, and will ensure citizens maximize their reimbursements from companies. while there are dozens of other examples of the never quit attitude of this administration and our citizens, there is none better than the merkel of route 45 in manalocee. the bridge had been completely washed away. i stood at the spot where the atlantic ocean flow into the bay, and once carried thousands of cars of days to vacationers down the shore. within days, the commissioner, the department of transportation, and our private sector partners and had a temporary road built to allow mercy vehicles onto the island. now nearly 10 weeks after the storm, you see a permanent route 35 already been re
will overshadow other issues that need to be addressed, like education and immigration reform. issues that could be held hostage until the spending fights are over. sylvia hall, "n.b.r.," washington. >> tom: other changes could soon be in store for washington: treasury secretary timothy geithner will leave the administration before the end of the month according to sources talking with bloomberg. that would mean geithner would leave as president obama and congress continue negotiating raising the nation's debt ceiling. geithner is the only remaining original member of president obama's economic team. the federal reserve is looking to end its bond buying programs this year, but there's no agreement as to when. minutes of the central bank's december meeting released today, show division among policymakers about when to stop the strategy. the federal reserve has been buying $85 billion worth of government mortgage-backed bonds per month in its effort to drive down long term interest rates. some on the fed want to stop, "well before the end of 2013." that sent stocks lower, the dow closed down 21 po
's in deciding between safety and education, we need women to really getting gauged in politics. truthfully, we need them to run for office. many more and more women to run for office. one of the big focuses over the next many years is to get more women to run for legislature, city council. that is our pipeline to congress. it is also the regulations and laws being passed everyday affecting our lives and the lives of our family. >> questions? >> i am kathryn lewis, a freelance journalist for "the new york times" and others. as a follow-up to a leash's question, i have seen coverage that women are no longer this block that politicians can expect to appeal to with one set of issues and you can no longer count on women to just vote on specific issues. can you address that question and the challenge for you and in general for viewing women as a monolithic voting bloc? >> i always thought that it was odd that we thought they were one issue voters to begin with. 51% of the population? women are very different in that population. what i think is really important here is that there are key economic pri
to educate folks about their options under clean power sf. so, we do have that component and group of individuals that will be canvassing san francisco with respect to clean power. we have a group of outreach specialists that's specifically for energy watch. and at least from our perspective at this moment, the two are not mutually exclusive, but to not confuse a customer with multiple messages, we've kept the two programs, two outreach programs separate at this point. >> but there's no like firewall between the two -- >> i don't know if there is a firewall. it's something i'll have to get back to you and the committee on. if there is any prohibition between marketing these programs and clean power sf. >> following up on supervisor avalos' comments around where your outreach or where the program participants are, i know that you said that it narrows the merchant areas. i guess the question i would also have is are you seeing higher pick up or participation in certain merchant areas versus others and why that would be? so, i guess for you, i'm wondering if the department might be ab
mean to the education camps and execution and all of those things. so i think the discussion that has to be made between leaders and their constituents is that if we see something that we can rectify, we should. but we have to understand the limitations of those interventions, because you are far worse off if you fail if you have never gone there to start with. this brings us to syria. i'm ashamed. i'm ashamed. i'm ashamed as an american. i've been to refugee camps and met the women have been gang raped. i've met the families have watched their kids shot before their eyes. i've met the defectors who said their instructions are to go around and kill and rape and torture. and while we sit by and watch that happen, without even giving them weapons to defend themselves, this will be a shameful chapter in american history, my friends, because we could've done something. and we can do something today but we won't. i hear that the new president has been reelected, we will be re-examining all. only 37,000 people have been massacred, i guess in the grand scheme of things that's not too many co
's important in the cities, on who is deciding where the money is going to go between safety and education. you talked about your state legislatures, it's incredibly important. we need women to really get engaged in politics, and we need them to run for office. we need more and more women to run for office, and we focus on democrats, and one of our big focuses in the next many years is to get more women to run for the legislature to run for city council to run for mayor's races, because that's our pipeline for congress, but it's also the regulations and laws getting passed every day that are affecting our lives and the lives of our families. >> thank you. other questions? >> i'm a journalist for -- [inaudible] >> in addition to -- i've also seen coverage that women are no longer big bloc that politicians can get with one issue and women maybe did make a difference because you can no longer count on them to just vote on issues -- can you address that question ask the challenge for you and in general in seeing women as a monolithic voting bloc. >> i've always thought it was odd -- because i've be
. it was a continuation of the libertarian movement about which ron paul rose. he was educated to become the political thinker by the works of the rakes of hayek and they always embraced leonard read of the foundation about what change was about, on educating one mind at a time. ron paul has used politics is the tool for that libertarian goal and if you asked me 10 years ago, i would've said maybe with the best tool because he was merely describes your outlier in congress, but he's proven me 100% wrong using the tool of major party politics. he's been one of the greatest educators for libertarianism of our time as david said. it's not just about politics. the other sort of gap that ron paul bridges is key to his appeal is the apocalyptic ron paul who was at the same time to very hopeful ron paul. ron paul is one of the other politicians around who is willing to say, america is not necessarily the greatest khmer riches come of this wonderful nation in the world that can only do rate overseas and if there's anything wrong, for the other guy. in foreign policy terms, behavior overseas is actually in some
, lizzie was in any conventional sense much better educated having attended both elementary and 40 school, and having herself worked as a teacher for many years. there seemed nothing that this capable woman couldn't do from laying linoleum to explaining mathematics. following the birth of their fourth child, she even helped handle affairs at the mill while skinner was away at england and later she helped run of the mill's boarding house. like many rural housewives she was intimately involved in her husband's business. but what set her apart was the fact that she was the wife of a rich manufacturer. there is no economic reason for her to be absorbing these kinds of responsibilities. she simply took them on, utilizing her amazing genius for organization and develop and. more than a wife to skinner, lizzie was a partner. skinner's first wife had died young, leaving him a way to work with two very small girls but lizzie had raised the girls as their own and given birth to eight more as well. of these 10 children, seven were still living, and adding to skinner's sense of the -- sense of a cong
consent. if you are under the age of whatever it is in the state you are not of age. we must educate our young males about this and think about that 12-minute video where the young males are laughing about a young woman being dead and raped and thinking that is not funny. this is not a woman. this is a rag doll that they play with. >> help me get into the minds of a group of young boys. does something happen to them when they are in a groupt that otherwise they would be mortified by? >> of course. there is a by stander phenomenon that has been well documented for adults, too. adults are guilty about this not just young people but this is a young person story. of course group process and group pressures particularly for young males can affect how they behave. what is interesting to me in that video there are males within that video saying hang on a second here and they are sort of laughed down and teased down by the other males. this is very similar to the phenomenon we saw in the subway victim pushed in front of a subway and nobody did anything. we are less likely to act in morally appro
for disease control and prevention, guns kill more than 5,000 kids each year. doctors usually try to educate parents about gun safety during regular checkups but a new law could change that. we'll talk with dr. sanjay gupta. i think that means we're taking a break but we'll come back and talk to you about it when we come back. [ male announcer ] this is sheldon, whose long dy setting up the news starts with arthritis pain and a choice. take tylenol or take aleve, the #1 recommended pain reliever by orthopedic doctors. just two aleve can keep pain away all day. back to the news. mommy's having a french fry. yes she is, yes she is. [ bop ] [ male announcer ] could've had a v8. 100% vegetable juice, with three of your daily vegetable servings in every little bottle. with three of your daily vegetable servings why take exercise so seriously,when it can be fun? push-ups or sprints? what's wrong with fetch? or chase? let's do this larry! ooh, i got it, i got it! (narrator) the calorie-smart nutrition in beneful healthy weight... includes grains and real chicken, because a healthy dog is a playful
the educational experience for all students. it's a valid concern say experts who suggest admissions boards rely as much on rigorous language screening as son test scores. >> then it can go smoothly. it takes training and the part of the staff, in fact, training of the faculty to engage these students within the classroom. >> and elsewhere on campus, where the number of chinese students pursuing an american education is only expected to grow. i see like more and more students come from mainland china and they like really want to have this opportunity here. >> in santa clara california, clauda cowan, fox news. >> i'm shannen bream in bottom of the hour. time for the top of the news. rare speech to supporters tonight we have rare reaction to what he said to the u.s. state department. it is yet another attempt by him to claim to power. it does nothing for the goal to a political condition. only for the syrians, but their allies, russian, not offered a peace plan and the rebels won't even talk. in u.s. politics, they would call it the optics and they're important. president assad >> too looking in c
dilute the educational experience for all students. it's a valid concern say experts who suggest admissions boards rely as much on rigorous language screening as son test scores. >> then it can go smoothly. it takes training and the part of the staff, in fact, training of the faculty to engage these students within the classroom. >> and elsewhere on campus, where the number of chinese students pursuing an american education is only expected to grow. i see like more and more students come from mainland china and they like really want to have this opportunity here. >> in santa clara california, clauda cowan, fox news. >> i'm shannen bream in tonight for harris falkner: assad gives a rare speech to supporter and what he says from the u.s. state department. urging syrians to defend their country against the rebels who started against his regime two years ago. it's now a civil war. and 60,000 people estimated to have been killed since it began, saying in a statement. assad's speech today is yet another attempt by the regime to cling to power and does nothing to advance the syrian peop
, education, and accused the taliban of promoting ignorance and they forbid girls to be in the classroom. >> our meteorologist, mike nicco, ahead with the forecast. >> computers models are less bullish on the rain. so we could have more time outside this weekend where it will be dry. hard to believe we have rain when we see the beautiful sky from emeryville but i will tell you what to expect. >> the daring deer rescue and what crews had to do to reach that poor scared animal stuck on the ice. he was terrified. why this is a huge significance for weddings in china >> oakland, sunty veil -- sunnyvale and all the bay area this is abc7 news. >> step on it for your flu shot, california will see a surge in flu cases in january. the result of holiday travelers coming back to california with a virus that heard is spreading fast elsewhere. also, kids going back did school, and abc medical medical doctor says california cannot escape the earliest flu outbreak if a decade. >> it could be a newer strain that people in the community have not sign, it could be that not enough people are vaccinated but
. and by the arthur vining davis foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. and contributions in the neighbourhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ would you be mine? ♪ could you be mine? ♪ won't you be my neighbour? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighbourhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ (trolley dings.) - thanks, trolley! hi, neighbour! it's me, daniel tiger. today i'm going to school! want to come to school with me? grr-ific! come on! - let's put your things in your cubb
in october by the pakistani taliban for supporting girls' rights to be educated. she was transferred from pakistan to britain for treatment. >>> al jazeera set its sights on one of the world's biggest tv markets, the united states. the satellite television network acquired a cable channel founded by former u.s. vice president al gore. al gore and a partner launched the network in 2005. it's available to about 60 million households. the government of qatar owns al jazeera. executives hope to double the number of their employees in the u.s. to more than 300. this man runs the network. he believes al jazeera could make a positive contribution to news available in the u.s. they launched their english news channel in 2006. the network gained international attention for going behind the scenes during the iraq war. reporters asked tough questions about u.s. military operations and about the u.s.-led occupation. spokesperson say viewers in the u.s. make up almost 40% of all online viewing but the image has kept cable tv companies from carrying it and english language programs can only be viewed i
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